Salem, Oregon, Practice Provides Much-Needed Services to Its Community

Hematology Oncology of Salem pic

Hematology Oncology of Salem
Image: hemoncofsalem.com

The winner of the Cambridge Who’s Who Professional of the Year in Medical Oncology and Hematology, triple board-certified physician Natasha Tiffany, MD, treats patients at Hematology Oncology of Salem, located in Oregon. Natasha Tiffany, MD, and the office’s other qualified staff members provide care for individuals with cancer and blood disorders. The practice has a focus on designing personalized treatment plans tailored to each patient’s needs.

Despite the demand for a state-of-the-art cancer treatment center in the Salem area, residents had few options before Hematology Oncology of Salem opened in 2000. The clinic now employs eight physicians, a family nurse practitioner, and two certified physician assistants. In 2002, the practice expanded to a second clinic in McMinnville, Oregon. It also has offices in Silverton and Woodburn, Oregon.

To learn more about Hematology Oncology of Salem, please visit www.hemoncofsalem.com. Among other information, the website contains video testimonials from patients who with the help of the practice have beaten cancer and blood disorders.

Targeted Cancer Therapy – An Introduction

Targeted Cancer Therapy pic

Targeted Cancer Therapy
Image: salemhosp.com

A privately practicing hematologist and oncologist in Salem, Oregon, Natasha Tiffany, MD, also serves as oncology medical director at Salem Hospital and affiliate assistant professor at the Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine. Natasha Tiffany, MD, draws on an in-depth knowledge of targeted therapies and other advancements in cancer care.

Targeted therapies for cancer are individualized cancer treatment options that work by identifying the molecular processes that speed tumor growth. Unlike traditional chemotherapies, which kill both cancerous and noncancerous cells, targeted therapies focus particularly on a particular process. Some are laboratory-produced antibodies that act on a particular cell target, while others are synthetic small-molecule chemicals.

Many targeted therapies block the chemical signals that tell cancer cells to grow. Others induce apoptosis, or cell death, by interrupting the breakdown of proteins that facilitate this process. Still others prevent the development of new blood vessels which, if left to grow uninterrupted, provide tumors with the nutrients that allow them to grow uncontrollably.

Within these general categories of targeted therapies exist a number of specific drugs. EGFR inhibitors, for example, block the growth of lung and colorectal cancers as well as some other tumors, while BRAF inhibitors target certain melanomas. Only an oncologist with experience in targeted cancer treatment can determine if such a therapy would be appropriate and, if so, which would provide the patient with the best chance of success.

Why Iron Deficiency Is a Cause for Concern

 

Iron Deficiency pic

Iron Deficiency
Image: WebMD.com

Natasha Tiffany, MD, has an extensive background as a board-certified hematologist and oncologist. One of the conditions that Natasha Tiffany, MD, treats is iron deficiency.

Iron does many things for the body and is used in the majority of cell functions. Therefore, iron deficiency can affect multiple systems and organs.

Iron deficiency occurs when there is not enough iron circulating in the blood. This type of deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies in the United States. There is a quick test that can be done to show if someone lacks enough iron in the blood.

Iron deficiency can delay an infant’s motor function, mental function, and processing skills. If a woman is pregnant and has iron deficiency, it places the pregnancy at high risk and increases the risk of a pre-term delivery. Fatigue is a major sign of iron deficiency, as are pale skin and shortness of breath.

The Facts on Sickle Cell Disease

sickle cell disease Image: just-health.net

sickle cell disease
Image: just-health.net

 

Natasha Tiffany, MD, is a board-certified hematologist and medical oncologist with experience in a hospital setting. Since 2004, Natasha Tiffany, MD, has been providing care at her private practice for patients diagnosed with such serious conditions as sickle cell disease.

Sickle cell disease involves disorders of hemoglobin in the blood. People with the disease have inherited two abnormal hemoglobin genes, one from each parent, and at least one of the genes causes the body to make hemoglobin S, the defective form of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

Instead of the normal disc shape, these red blood cells are shaped like a sickle (hence the name) and are inflexible and tend to stick to blood vessel walls, obstructing the flow of blood. This deprives tissues of oxygen, leading to sudden attacks of pain, called pain crises. A lifelong illness, sickle cell disease requires the patient to remain under an oncology doctor’s care.

The disease mainly affects those of African descent. In the United States, approximately 1 in 365 black children are born with the disease, and around 100,000 Americans live with sickle cell disease today.

Oberlin’s Unique Double-Degree System

Oberlin Conservatory of Music pic

Oberlin Conservatory of Music
Image: new.oberlin.edu

Natasha Tiffany, MD, is a hematology and oncology specialist based in Salem, Oregon, who is currently active in the development and management of the Salem Cancer Institute. Apart from her medical training, Natasha Tiffany, MD, is also a classically trained pianist who completed the piano program at the prestigious Oberlin Conservatory of Music.

The Ohio-based Oberlin Conservatory of Music is the oldest such institution in the US, and is noted for maintaining an outstanding reputation, consistently being cited as one of the best music schools in the country. Oberlin also initiated several innovations in music education,

Oberlin College and Conservatory is credited with being the birthplace of the double degree, whereby graduates leave with another concentration besides music. The double degree has become a prime consideration for high-achieving students to consider Oberlin. The program enables students with multiple talents and interests to satisfy more than one of them at the same time.

American Society of Clinical Oncology Hosts Annual Meeting in Chicago

American Society of Clinical Oncology pic

American Society of Clinical Oncology
Image: asco.org

Since 2004, Natasha Tiffany, MD, has worked as a physician for Hematology Oncology of Salem in Oregon. As a hematologist and oncologist, Natasha Tiffany, MD, takes care of patients daily and stays up-to-date with industry-wide changes by maintaining membership with the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Established in 1964, ASCO began as an organization dedicated to clinical oncology. ASCO hosts several annual networking opportunities, including conferences, seminars, and professional workshops.

One event hosted by ASCO is its annual meeting, with the 2016 meeting occurring June 3 through 7 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. Funded through the Conquer Cancer Foundation, this annual meeting typically brings in more than 30,000 oncology professionals from around the globe. Titled Collective Wisdom: The Future of Patient-Centered Care and Research, the 2016 event will cover topics such as clinical trial design, geriatric oncology, rapid learning systems, and genomics. Attendees will learn who the organization’s award recipients are, hear updates on the state of the society, and listen to the president’s address. In addition, the annual meeting will feature educational sessions, mentoring opportunities for fellows, and poster discussions.

What to Know about Anastrozole

Anastrozole pic

Anastrozole
Image: thinksteroids.com

A physician partner practicing in Salem, Oregon, Natasha Tiffany, MD, possesses more than two decades of medical experience. Handling oncology cases, Natasha Tiffany, MD, is knowledgeable of aromatase inhibitors, such as anastrozole.

Among the treatments available for female patients diagnosed with breast cancer is anastrozole. The drug caters to individuals who are past menopause as well as those who have received tamoxifen therapy that resulted in further disease progression. In particular, anastrozole can reduce the size of tumors by lowering a person’s blood estradiol concentration.

A doctor must prescribe anastrozole to a patient and offer instructions for consumption and dosage. The medicine can be taken with or without food, but only one dose is recommended at a time. A missed dose should be consumed as soon as possible. If the timeframe is nearing a next dose, the patient should skip the missed dose and then return to their normal schedule. A medical professional can give further information on the drug’s use and side effects.