Why Iron Deficiency Is a Cause for Concern

 

Iron Deficiency pic

Iron Deficiency
Image: WebMD.com

Natasha Tiffany, MD, has an extensive background as a board-certified hematologist and oncologist. One of the conditions that Natasha Tiffany, MD, treats is iron deficiency.

Iron does many things for the body and is used in the majority of cell functions. Therefore, iron deficiency can affect multiple systems and organs.

Iron deficiency occurs when there is not enough iron circulating in the blood. This type of deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies in the United States. There is a quick test that can be done to show if someone lacks enough iron in the blood.

Iron deficiency can delay an infant’s motor function, mental function, and processing skills. If a woman is pregnant and has iron deficiency, it places the pregnancy at high risk and increases the risk of a pre-term delivery. Fatigue is a major sign of iron deficiency, as are pale skin and shortness of breath.

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The Facts on Sickle Cell Disease

sickle cell disease Image: just-health.net

sickle cell disease
Image: just-health.net

 

Natasha Tiffany, MD, is a board-certified hematologist and medical oncologist with experience in a hospital setting. Since 2004, Natasha Tiffany, MD, has been providing care at her private practice for patients diagnosed with such serious conditions as sickle cell disease.

Sickle cell disease involves disorders of hemoglobin in the blood. People with the disease have inherited two abnormal hemoglobin genes, one from each parent, and at least one of the genes causes the body to make hemoglobin S, the defective form of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

Instead of the normal disc shape, these red blood cells are shaped like a sickle (hence the name) and are inflexible and tend to stick to blood vessel walls, obstructing the flow of blood. This deprives tissues of oxygen, leading to sudden attacks of pain, called pain crises. A lifelong illness, sickle cell disease requires the patient to remain under an oncology doctor’s care.

The disease mainly affects those of African descent. In the United States, approximately 1 in 365 black children are born with the disease, and around 100,000 Americans live with sickle cell disease today.