American Society of Clinical Oncology Hosts Annual Meeting in Chicago

American Society of Clinical Oncology pic

American Society of Clinical Oncology
Image: asco.org

Since 2004, Natasha Tiffany, MD, has worked as a physician for Hematology Oncology of Salem in Oregon. As a hematologist and oncologist, Natasha Tiffany, MD, takes care of patients daily and stays up-to-date with industry-wide changes by maintaining membership with the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Established in 1964, ASCO began as an organization dedicated to clinical oncology. ASCO hosts several annual networking opportunities, including conferences, seminars, and professional workshops.

One event hosted by ASCO is its annual meeting, with the 2016 meeting occurring June 3 through 7 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. Funded through the Conquer Cancer Foundation, this annual meeting typically brings in more than 30,000 oncology professionals from around the globe. Titled Collective Wisdom: The Future of Patient-Centered Care and Research, the 2016 event will cover topics such as clinical trial design, geriatric oncology, rapid learning systems, and genomics. Attendees will learn who the organization’s award recipients are, hear updates on the state of the society, and listen to the president’s address. In addition, the annual meeting will feature educational sessions, mentoring opportunities for fellows, and poster discussions.

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What to Know about Anastrozole

Anastrozole pic

Anastrozole
Image: thinksteroids.com

A physician partner practicing in Salem, Oregon, Natasha Tiffany, MD, possesses more than two decades of medical experience. Handling oncology cases, Natasha Tiffany, MD, is knowledgeable of aromatase inhibitors, such as anastrozole.

Among the treatments available for female patients diagnosed with breast cancer is anastrozole. The drug caters to individuals who are past menopause as well as those who have received tamoxifen therapy that resulted in further disease progression. In particular, anastrozole can reduce the size of tumors by lowering a person’s blood estradiol concentration.

A doctor must prescribe anastrozole to a patient and offer instructions for consumption and dosage. The medicine can be taken with or without food, but only one dose is recommended at a time. A missed dose should be consumed as soon as possible. If the timeframe is nearing a next dose, the patient should skip the missed dose and then return to their normal schedule. A medical professional can give further information on the drug’s use and side effects.